The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and rate of human papillomavirus vaccination coverage in Florida, 2011 through 2015.

J Am Dent Assoc. 2020 Jan;151(1):51-58. doi: 10.1016/j.adaj.2019.08.022.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The authors aimed to compare the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) from 2011 through 2015 and the rate of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination from 2015 through 2017 in the United States overall and in Florida.

METHODS:

Using SEER*Stat software (Surveillance Research Program, National Cancer Institute), the authors calculated age-specific OPC incidence rates for various age groups and age-adjusted rates by sex and race to analyze Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and National Program of Cancer Registries data. The authors used Joinpoint software (Surveillance Research Program, National Cancer Institute) to model time trends of OPC incidence. They estimated the rate of HPV vaccination among teenagers in Florida and explored the main reasons parents gave for not getting their children vaccinated by means of analyzing data from the National Immunization Survey-Teen. The authors used the χ2 test to determine the association between sociodemographic factors and HPV vaccination and to compare the rate of HPV vaccination in the United States overall with that in Florida.

RESULTS:

The incidence of OPC was higher and the rate of HPV vaccination was lower in Florida than in the United States overall. The OPC incidence rate was highest in those who were aged 50 through 70 years, non-Hispanic white, and male. The rate of being up-to-date on HPV vaccination in Florida was higher among female teenagers than male teenagers but did not differ significantly by other sociodemographic characteristics. The top reason for not getting an HPV vaccination in Florida was that it had not been recommended.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors found relatively higher and increasing incidence rate of OPC in Florida and lower rate of HPV vaccination among adolescents in Florida than in the nation overall.

PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS:

The trends illustrated may stimulate policy changes to increase HPV vaccination for children and enhance the understanding of its benefits.

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